Rebuilding the Jedi Order

Haunted by the past, hopeful for the future.

While being hunted by the ruthless and unwavering Galactic Empire, our diffident protagonist, Cal Kestis, attempts to retrace the journey of a Jedi Master and seeks to uncover the secrets of the Zeffo. An ancient civilization that had an unprecedented understanding of the mysteries of the Force. Who were also fascinated by rolling giant balls around, and who would bestow their knowledge unto those capable of doing so. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order is an extraordinarily engaging narrative-driven RPG in which you endeavour to rebuild the Jedi Order while collecting many stylish ponchos.

You’ll also be collecting various seeds for the Mantis’ terrarium.

Those, much like the ponchos, are of the utmost importance and contribute greatly to your success, should you ever wish to befriend Greez. Which has its benefits. He does become slightly less crotchety with every seed recovered, despite being incredibly vocal about his hatred of nature.

Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order also features vast landscapes to explore and it’s ridiculously fun to do so. While many of the rewards are cosmetic, secrets, such as Stim Canisters, are incredibly valuable and are always worth pursuing. Even if you’re being relentlessly pursued by the sadistic Second Sister. She can wait until you’ve discovered every chest, secret, and upgrade for BD-1 on every planet. It’s not like you’re the last hope for hundreds of Force-sensitive children. Which is not to suggest that exploration is always frivolous, as exploring each of the ancient tombs often results in Cal strengthening his connection to the Force and learning a new Force ability. Of which there are only a few but they are incredibly useful. Not that I’d necessarily agree that being able to jump twice requires a deeper connection to the Force, but I digress.

Surprisingly agile. Unsurprisingly bloodthirsty.

Character development is tied to Force abilities, as each one further expands the skill tree allowing for greater proficiency in combat and heightened character statistics. There aren’t too many ways to develop Cal besides that. You can fully customise the appearance of his lightsaber, and unlock new lightsaber styles throughout the main campaign. Each offering its own unique fighting style with its own advantages and disadvantages. Which is perfectly suited to the exhilarating lightsaber duels with the Sith, but doesn’t significantly alter the offensive (or defensive) capabilities of his lightsaber.

That’s reserved for the Lightsaber Mastery skill.

You can find equipment that allows you to explore previously inaccessible areas, but it doesn’t aid you in combat nor does it change Cal’s base statistics considerably. However, while limited, character development is meaningful, as each investment into the skill tree yields decent rewards.

I wasn’t really sure what to expect from Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order. Whether it would be a complex RPG experience akin to Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic, or whether it would favour an action-orientated approach emphasising storytelling. In retrospect I’d say it was mostly the latter. But that’s not to say that there aren’t RPG mechanics, and utilising them will only further the techniques and abilities available to you in combat. Or while exploring planets. Exploration certainly makes up the bulk of the experience but that’s not a bad thing. Not when the exploration is as enjoyable as it was, and when you’re actually excited about returning to Bogano for the fifth time. I’d highly recommend it to those who enjoy Star Wars (in any shape or form) or those looking for an in-depth single player RPG experience.

Have a nice week, all!

Moggie

Secrets of the Zeffo

A civilization fixated on rolling giant balls around.

Given that many of their secrets allow for greater understanding of the Force, and that you don’t need to be Force-sensitive to roll a giant ball around, it does seem like an odd way to assess the suitability of those searching for answers. It certainly makes exploring ancient tombs more interesting, though. If only the Galactic Empire didn’t have the Sith who could just as easily uncover these secrets, then we might have a chance to rebuild the Jedi Order. Not that the crew of the Mantis is without hope. We’ve rolled enough giant balls into their sockets to uncover the secrets of two ancient tombs.

Now we’ve just got to uncover the secrets of the third.

But, as we’ve gained additional Force abilities, and BD-1 has been upgraded with new technology, we’re going to completely ignore the Galactic Empire to explore planets. To acquire ponchos and other cosmetic rewards. Maybe uncover a few secrets, too. Those tend to offer the greatest benefits.

While ponchos and other cosmetic rewards are neat, unlocking new (or upgrading existing) equipment and technology allows for further exploration of each planet. Or allows for progression through the main campaign. Cosmetic rewards are only useful if you’re actually going to wear them, or apply them to BD-1 and the Mantis. Force echoes can also be discovered, and they serve to enrich your understanding of the history of the planet you’re currently exploring. So there are quite a few things to do on each planet and exploring them is ridiculously fun. I’d just be more enthusiastic to find anything other than secrets if the rewards from chests were more meaningful. Not that I’ve ever cared for cosmetic rewards. So the aforementioned probably says more about me than about the rewards themselves.

BD-1 is the bravest companion a Jedi could have.

I am intending to return to each planet to fully explore it, though. Collect all of the chests, secrets, and interesting technological upgrades present. Even if I’ll have more ponchos than any one Jedi knows what to do with. I’d personally prefer some robes. Not that we’d be able to hide from the Galactic Empire very effectively when we resemble the atypical Jedi, but at least we’d look stylish and that’s what truly matters. It won’t take too long as I’ll have my trusty (and sometimes confusing) Holomap to lead the way. It’s definitely one of the better maps I’ve had the pleasure of navigating planets with.

It just becomes confusing with larger planets.

Notably, it highlights the areas that you can (and can’t) reach with your abilities as they currently are. Which not only allows you to know what’s actually inaccessible, but also (rather conveniently) highlights the areas that have become accessible as a result of acquiring new equipment or technology.

I’ve greatly enjoyed my time with Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order. It’s a very capable single player experience which doesn’t artificially extend existing content. Everything happens as you would expect it to, and besides Stim Canisters, which are arguably the most valuable secret, there are few reasons to revisit (and fully explore) every planet besides the cosmetic rewards. Which some may consider a failing of the exploration mechanics. But I find it very refreshing to revisit planets as and when I want to, without being required to grind through hours of thoughtless content. You’ve no obligation to collect everything but you can if you want to. Or you can continue with the main campaign. Or you can do some combination of both. It’s entirely up to you when you want to approach things, or if you want to approach them at all..

Have a nice week, all!

Moggie

Massively Multiplayer Online Moggie

It’s kind of funny to think back to when I first started playing Guild Wars.

Y’see, back then, while co-op and online multiplayer existed, it certainly didn’t exist in quite the same way. You couldn’t log into a video game and suddenly be met with hundreds of other players who were real people just like you. Most of the time when met with hundreds of players in video games they were NPCs or server spawned entities. So the idea that, simultaneously and in real time, other players were in the game with you was an odd concept. Of course, as time has progressed, and technology has advanced, this is a pretty standard thing nowadays.

I’m still amazed by that progression in technology, though.

Even though MMOs are far more common these days and you have millions of people playing them- the base technological advancements that made them possible are still fascinating. To think, in my lifetime alone, we’ve gone from sprites on cartridges to full 3D models delivered through digital channels. It’s crazy. Kind of makes you wonder where it’ll go next.

It also makes me sound a lot older than I actually am. But, back on point, Guild Wars was an experience as I didn’t really know what I was getting myself into at the time. I didn’t think that I’d be actively working with other people, helping other people, and completing objectives with other people. Having played a number of single player titles up until that point I was only slightly used to cooperative play. These experiences led onto the years to come when I would take on World of Warcraft, Final Fantasy XIV, Star Wars: The Old Republic, and Guild Wars 2.

I’m certainly more used to MMOs these days. Many single player titles have taken inspiration and inherited mechanics from MMOs (mostly around crafting systems), while they’re more abundant than they were, and there are more for different universes. Many major titles or series end up trying the MMO market once or twice in their time too. Final Fantasy has put out two now and I don’t think XIV will be their last, either. Equally some titles (like Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning) were apparently built as MMOs originally and then converted to single player. That and the fact that most single player titles feature either full campaign multiplayer, arena style multiplayer, or mission based multiplayer as well.

However, the reason I’m putting out this post is to inform you all of what’s happening next with the two MMO related series on Moggie’s Proclamations. The first, SW:TOR The Jal’Frezi Legacy, will likely be on hold for some time to come as I don’t know when I’m next going to pick it up. I fully intend to go back to it, but when I do, and if I start posting about it immediately, are open to interpretation. Guild Wars 2: Tyrian Travels while far from over is slowing down with many of the characters moving into straight levelling.

We’re ahead of the curve a little on crafting disciplines now so I can afford to make equipment for my characters, to spend less time farming materials, and to spend more time moving towards whatever goals I have in store for them. In either case they’re not over and they will return- I just don’t know/can’t say when that will be.

As always, I try to balance the content I put out so there’s a little of something for everyone. I also try not to sit on topics for too long (they might melt).

Have a nice week, all!

Moggie

SW:TOR The Jal’frezi Legacy (Return to the Republic)

It’s your sister from another mother (and server).

Every so often I get an itch that doesn’t go away. I’ve wondered if this might be some kind of skin condition, yeast infection, or other bodily malfunction but in reality it’s more than likely that I want to play an MMO. Is it normal for your body to itch when you want to game? No? Well, that just makes me all kinds of special.

Star Wars: The Old Republic is one of those games that I find myself wanting to go back to several times a month. Ironically, that’s the reason I actually stopped subscribing to most MMOs that I played- I didn’t play them enough to warrant the cost. Not in the sense that I wasn’t getting enough hours a week out of the subscription or anything like that… more that I would play for a few weeks and then take a few off and then play for a few more. In the three-four years I played World of Warcraft there were at least six months where I wasn’t actually subscribed. It’s just the way I play games, to be honest. I’ll play something for a good chunk of time and then not come back to it for a while.

Bit like Dragonball XenoVerse. Played it, finished the Time Patrol, finished the Parallel Quests, invested 40hrs, and now setting it down for a bit.

Mercy is more than you deserve.

Mercy is more than you deserve.

That’s why something like the free to play model that Star Wars: The Old Republic uses is actually pretty useful. As I can pick a new server and roll a new character to just play through the content, enjoy the adventures, and just have fun with the game without subscribing again. If I decide I’m really into it I might subscribe for a month or two, but, at the moment, it’s just a temporary return. I always enjoyed the Jedi Consular as a class and I’ll get to see the Jedi Sage side of it now. I wouldn’t free to play with my characters under the Jal’frezi Legacy, though.

There are a few things (like less experience/rewards from questing) that would bug me if I did subscribe and these characters permanently missed those things. Not to say I’m not willing to pay for it- far from it- I actually fully intend to subscribe again. At some point where I feel I will be playing it for more than a week and a bit at a time.

Having an absolute blast, though. Rolled on an RP server and I’ve not really done any roleplaying (nor intend to) but it’s a nice little server. Not too many pressures for doing instances or group missions and the folks seem friendly enough. Quite a quiet place, too. You don’t generally see many people spawning on Tython (while it is a starting area you do have to come back sometimes) and you’re generally allowed to quest at your own pace. Which is nice. Guilds are a bit sparse overall. But then I never really looked at guilds on my main server too often to be honest.

I also enjoy going back and levelling new characters after a while. That was one thing about World of Warcraft when I stopped playing- I didn’t have any fresh meat to train. Unless I wanted to roll a Pandaren Monk and choose to either have another Horde or Alliance character. So, it’s definitely a finite experience and will eventually reach an end. One day.

In any case, just a little update to say that the Jal’frezi Legacy is not completely dead.

Have a nice week, all!

Moggie

SW:TOR The Jal’frezi Legacy (Pt. 9)

All things are fair in love and war. Also, in patching.

Earlier in December we saw the unveiling of the latest patch for Star Wars: The Old Republic which covers the newest expansion, many changes, some fixes, and a little bit of something for everyone wherever you find yourself in the game. It’s a pretty positive patch on reflection. Well, if you like the changes. If you don’t- maybe not.

I didn’t end up pre-ordering the expansion as there was little benefit to my characters in doing so. I mean, sure, there were some cool pre-order bonuses- but with hardly anyone at or around the level cap there wasn’t much point in having the Lvl 50+ content. I also like levelling so zooming past that at the speed of light with the experience bonus wasn’t really a selling point for me. It also means I didn’t get the early access to expansion areas (see previous reasons as to why this bothers me hardly at all), but, if you did, then you would have been able to play for something like seven days longer than anyone else. Neat, huh?

So very exciting... but so confusing at the same time.

So very exciting… but so confusing at the same time.

One of the more surprising things in the patch notes (as I wasn’t aware it was being changed) is the adjustment of the levelling process. It apparently now takes less time to reach the level cap as enemies aren’t as tough, they have less health, and they die easier. This is something that every MMO will need to address at some point- however, despite the necessity- does it really work in your favour to dilute the content pre-level cap? Lots of people (myself included) love the levelling process and making that easier isn’t always better.

In this case I can’t say from experience (as I haven’t done any levelling) how it will change the overall levelling speed, how much quicker it is, or how much easier it is, but I can support the reasoning behind it. I feel it’s always positive to keep a consistent pace while levelling and progressing to more content.

I wonder if this will affect the experience at all and whether you will still need to do several of the side quests. No experience adjustments mentioned but that doesn’t mean it’s not there.

The Disciplines system is something that I have incredibly positive feelings for as it solves many of the issues I hoped it would. Or, at least, in the limited exposure I’ve had to it on my Jedi Guardian. I’m almost kicking myself that I didn’t wait until this came out to start levelling him as he has access to so many more tanking talents and abilities, not to mention he’s gained many earlier than he would have, while he’s also got some new things that he didn’t have before, and overall I can’t say anything bad about this. At all. He certainly seems more like a tank should be. Though his rotation has changed slightly I’m indifferent as he can do so much more now.

I know many a hybrid character will be lamenting the loss of the system that allowed them such flexibility before but I think it’s a positive change for everyone. I can’t say that with certainty as I wasn’t playing for long before this new change came in so the veteran players might disagree, which, to be honest, they have every right to. Everyone likes different things.

Though SW:TOR hasn’t been on my list of things to play for a few weeks this patch might just bring me back to the Force. Or the soldiers of the Imperial or Republic armies.

Have a nice Sunday, all!

Moggie.