First Impurressions of… Cat Quest II

Tales of a mewsical mewgician.

Who tours the flourishing fields of Felingard strumming their lute, opening gravitational rifts, and summoning lasers from space. Who traded the majority of their health for ranged magical damage, and who now relies on their trusty canine companion to deal physical damage while they frantically skirt around enemies. Cat Quest II is the wonderfully fun and mechanically diverse sequel to Cat Quest, which purrfectly illustrates how cats and dogs can coexist peacefully. Or could if they weren’t embroiled in a meaningless war being fought to prove the superiority of their species.

Magic has been greatly expanded in the sequel, too.

Which affords greater build pawsibilities, but equipping a magical weapon, such as the Bard Lute, drastically reduces your maximum health. So you’ll be trading survivability for heightened damage potential. However, there are a few weapons, such as the Stormbringer, that allow you to have both.

Due to the co-operative mechanics present in the sequel it’s pawsible to build towards both magical and physical damage, as you can easily switch to your canine (or feline) companion to defeat foes unaffected by either damage type. Of which there are quite a few. The individual damage types matter, too. As some enemies are entirely resistant to fire or arcane damage, but are susceptible to ice damage. Which encourages you to keep multiple magical weapons upgraded. While most magical armour will increase a certain damage type by 15% per piece, allowing you to deal 45% more damage if using the appropriate magical weapon as well. But you can also combine different sets for their statistical bonuses. Such as the Bard set which increases mana regeneration, or the Gentle set which reduces the mana cost of spells.

Those who set paw in this tomb will become terriers.

Until I reached Lvl 100 I always had my companion wearing the Dog Soldier set, which is interchangeable with the Cat Soldier set, depending on whether you favour health or armour, and increases experience gained from defeating enemies by 20% per piece. It feels as though equipment has been significantly rebalanced in the sequel, making it harder to choose between raw statistical bonuses and pawerful passive effects. Wearing the Arcane Mage Hat would’ve afforded higher arcane damage, but the Skeleton King Crown granted additional armour and increased survivability.

Which I was in dire need of when using a magical weapon.

Upgrading equipment has been simplified, too. Rather than opening chests and randomly acquiring upgrades, as you would in Cat Quest, you now visit Kit Cat (for armour) or Hotto Doggo (for weapons) to upgrade specific equipment, which costs slightly more but has a guaranteed result.

Cat Quest II is an incredibly impurressive sequel that revisits previously established mechanics and implements more intuitive iterations of them. Everything from equipment choices to enemy variety has more depth and feels more complex, which results in a greatly satisfying experience that’s delightfully fun. It’s also littered with just as many (if not more) cat puns. As is this post. With the release of the Mew World update the experience is at its best, with Mew Game being reintroduced alongside the Meowdifiers which make revisiting the campaign even more fun than it would be otherwise. Or more challenging. Depending on which approach you decide to take. I would highly recommend Cat Quest II to those looking for a light-hearted, enjoyable, feline-themed ARPG experience. Especially if you love cats as much as I do.

Have a nice week, all!

Moggie

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